The Sun in the News ...

  The amazing moment the sun stamps out its own eruption: NASA footage captures magnetic forces as they shred dense solar material and cause it to collapse   Daily Mail - August 13, 2017
Spectacular footage of what first appeared to be a solar eruption, but then turned out to be something else, has given scientists insight into the sun's magnetic landscape. On September 30, 2014, a suite of NASA instruments spotted what appeared to be a solar eruption - but soon after, a serpentine structure known as a filament rose from the surface and collapsed, being shredded to pieces by invisible magnetic forces. A study on the phenomenon revealed it was caused by a filament pushing up against a complex magnetic structure 'like two igloos smashed against each other,' which then ate away at the filament and caused chips of solar material to spray.

NASA watches the Sun put a stop to its own eruption   PhysOrg - August 13, 2017
On Sept. 30, 2014, multiple NASA observatories watched what appeared to be the beginnings of a solar eruption. A filament - a serpentine structure consisting of dense solar material and often associated with solar eruptions - rose from the surface, gaining energy and speed as it soared. But instead of erupting from the Sun, the filament collapsed, shredded to pieces by invisible magnetic forces. Because scientists had so many instruments observing the event, they were able to track the entire event from beginning to end, and explain for the first time how the Sun's magnetic landscape terminated a solar eruption.

Sun experiences seasonal changes, new research finds   PhysOrg - April 7, 2015
The Sun undergoes a type of seasonal variability with its activity waxing and waning over the course of nearly two years, according to a new study by a team of researchers led by the National Center for Atmospheric Research (NCAR). This behavior affects the peaks and valleys in the approximately 11-year solar cycle, sometimes amplifying and sometimes weakening the solar storms that can buffet Earth's atmosphere. The quasi-annual variations appear to be driven by changes in the bands of strong magnetic fields in each solar hemisphere. These bands also help shape the approximately 11-year solar cycle that is part of a longer cycle that lasts about 22 years.

The Sun

Current Solar Activity - NOAA